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Thursday, July 24, 2014


The Indian Analyst


 

South Indian Inscriptions


 

Contents

Index

Introduction

Contents

List of Plates

Additions and Corrections

Images

Contents

Altekar, A. S

Bhattasali, N. K

Barua, B. M And Chakravarti, Pulin Behari

Chakravarti, S. N

Chhabra, B. CH

Das Gupta

Desai, P. B

Gai, G. S

Garde, M. B

Ghoshal, R. K

Gupte, Y. R

Kedar Nath Sastri

Khare, G. H

Krishnamacharlu, C. R

Konow, Sten

Lakshminarayan Rao, N

Majumdar, R. C

Master, Alfred

Mirashi, V. V

Mirashi, V. V., And Gupte, Y. R

Narasimhaswami, H. K

Nilakanta Sastri And Venkataramayya, M

Panchamukhi, R. S

Pandeya, L. P

Raghavan, V

Ramadas, G

Sircar, Dines Chandra

Somasekhara Sarma

Subrahmanya Aiyar

Vats, Madho Sarup

Venkataramayya, M

Venkatasubba Ayyar

Vaidyanathan, K. S

Vogel, J. Ph

Index.- By M. Venkataramayya

Other South-Indian Inscriptions 

Volume I

Volume II

Volume III

Vol. IV - VIII

Volume IX

Volume X

Volume XI

Volume XII

Volume XIII

Volume XIV

Volume XV

Volume XVI

Volume XVII

Volume XVIII

Volume XIX

Volume XX

Volume XXII_Part I

Volume XXII_Part II

Tanjavur

Tiruvarur

Volume XXIII

Volume XXIV

Archaeological Links

Archaeological-Survey of India

EPIGRAPHIA INDICA

BOBBILI PLATES OF CHANDAVARMAN, KING OF KALINGA ; YEAR 4

(1 Plate)

R. K. GHOSHAL, CALCUTTA

The copper-plates, which bear the subjoined inscription, were received in the Office of the Superintendent for Epigraphy, Madras, from Mr. Sivaramadas, as inhabitant of Bobbili in the Vizagapatam District of Madras, through the Tahsildar of that place. The plates which have since been presented by Mr. Sivaramadas to Government, are now deposited in the Archaeological Section of the Indian Museum, Calcutta. Only short notices of the plates have appeared[1] till now. I edit the inscription for the first time from a set of ink-impressions kindly supplied by Dr. N. P. Chakravarti, Government Epigraphist for India.

These are three plates of copper with plain edges, measuring 6½″ by 2⅛″. Towards the proper right end of each plate, there is a ring-hole, ⅜″ in diameter, through which the plates slide on to a copper ring, 2¾″ in diameter. The ends of the ring are soldered on to an elliptical seal measuring 1⅛″ by ⅝″. The seal bears, in a rectangular incuse, the legend Pitri(tṛi)bhaktaḥ in the same alphabet as that of the plates.

_________________________________

[1]Annual Report on South Indian Epigraphy, 1934-35,p. 6, No. 12 of Appendix A, and pp. 51-52 ; also Annual Report of Arch. Surv. India, 1934-35, p. 64.

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