The Indian Analyst
 

South Indian Inscriptions

 

 

Contents

Index

Introduction

Contents

List of Plates

Additions and Corrections

Images

Contents

Chaudhury, P.D.

Chhabra, B.ch.

DE, S. C.

Desai, P. B.

Dikshit, M. G.

Krishnan, K. G.

Desai, P. B

Krishna Rao, B. V.

Lakshminarayan Rao, N., M.A.

Mirashi, V. V.

Narasimhaswami, H. K.

Pandeya, L. P.,

Sircar, D. C.

Venkataramayya, M., M.A.,

Venkataramanayya, N., M.A.

Index-By A. N. Lahiri

Other South-Indian Inscriptions 

Volume 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Vol. 4 - 8

Volume 9

Volume 10

Volume 11

Volume 12

Volume 13

Volume 14

Volume 15

Volume 16

Volume 17

Volume 18

Volume 19

Volume 20

Volume 22
Part 1

Volume 22
Part 2

Volume 23

Volume 24

Volume 26

Volume 27

Tiruvarur

Darasuram

Konerirajapuram

Tanjavur

Annual Reports 1935-1944

Annual Reports 1945- 1947

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 2, Part 2

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 7, Part 3

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 1

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 2

Epigraphica Indica

Epigraphia Indica Volume 3

Epigraphia
Indica Volume 4

Epigraphia Indica Volume 6

Epigraphia Indica Volume 7

Epigraphia Indica Volume 8

Epigraphia Indica Volume 27

Epigraphia Indica Volume 29

Epigraphia Indica Volume 30

Epigraphia Indica Volume 31

Epigraphia Indica Volume 32

Paramaras Volume 7, Part 2

Śilāhāras Volume 6, Part 2

Vākāṭakas Volume 5

Early Gupta Inscriptions

Archaeological Links

Archaeological-Survey of India

Pudukkottai

EPIGRAPHIA INDICA

TWO JAINA INSCRIPTIONS IN TAMIL

P. B. DESAI, OOTACAMUND

While surveying the epigraphical sources for my work on Jainism in South India,[2] I had to go through the Jaina inscriptions in the Tamil country critically. In the course of this study I noticed certain peculiar features regarding the religious history of Jainism in this region, which had a characteristic development of its own. One of them is the evolution of the Yakshī cult. With a view to illustrating this particular point I select here two typical inscriptions[3] and try to explain their significance briefly.

INSCRIPTION I

This inscription is engraved on a boulder of the hillock called Āṇḍimalai near the village Chōḷavāṇḍipuram in the Tirukkovilur taluk of the South Arcot District, Madras State. It was copied by the office of the Superintendent for Epigraphy, Madras, in the field season of 1936-37.[4] The bolder containing this inscription leans against another boulder thus forming

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[1] This verse makes it clear that the record was first written on the plate with ink or similar material and then engraved.
[2] This volume comprises a detailed survey of the Jaina inscriptions selected from the three main regions of South India, namely, Āndhradēśa, Tamilnāḍ and Karnāṭaka. The book which is now in an advanced stage of printing is being published as the third issue of the series Jīvarāja Jaina Granthamālā, Sholāpur.
[3] My thanks are due to the Government Epigraphist for India for his kind permission to edit these records here.
[4] It is registered as No. 251 of the year’s epigraphical collection.

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