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Thursday, October 17, 2013


The Indian Analyst


 

South Indian Inscriptions


 

EPIGRAPHIA INDICA

No. 40.─ KARHAD PLATES OF KRISHNA III. ;

SAKA-SAMVAT 880.

BY R. G. BHANDARKAR, M.A., PH.D., C.I.E.

These copper plates were found at Karhâḍ in the Satara district while the foundations of an old and dilapidated house were being dug out, and were put into my hands by Mr. Hari Narayan Apte, the present manager of the Ânandâśrama in Poona. They are three in number, and each is 13½ inches long and 9 inches the broad. The first and the third plates are engraved on one side, and the second on both. The letters are well-formed and legible throughout, except in one place where an original mistake has been corrected by something else being engraved in its place (line 21).

The inscription on the plates records the grant of the village of Kaṅkêṁ (ll. 62 and 65), situated in the district of Karahâṭa and belonging to the Kalli group of twelve (l. 61 f.), by Kṛishṇarâja (v. 24), who was also called Akâlavarsha and Vallabha (l. 55), and who was Kṛishṇa III. of the Râshṭrakûṭa family. The grantee was Gaganaśiva (ll. 61 and 65), who was versed in all the Śivasiddhântas. He was the pupil of Îśânaśiva of Karahâṭa (l. 59 f.),─ the modern Karhâḍ ;─ and the grant was made for the maintenance of the ascetics that lived at the place (l. 61).

The date of the grant was Wednesday, the thirteenth tithi of the dark fortnight of Phâlguna of the cyclic year Kâlayukta, the Śaka year being 880 past (l. 56 f.). Professor Kielhorn has favoured the Editor with the following remarks on this date :─ “ Śaka-Saṁvat 880 expired by the southern luni-solar system was Kâlayukta, and the equivalent of the date is

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