The Indian Analyst
 

South Indian Inscriptions

 

 

Contents

Index

Introduction

Contents

Additions and Corrections

Images

Contents

Rev. J.E. Abbott

R.G. Bhandarkar

Prof. G. Buhler

W. Cartellieri

J.F. Fleet

E. Hultzsch

Prof. Kielhorn

Prof. Kielhorn, and
H. Krishna Sastri

H. Luders

G.V. Ramamurti

J. Ramayya

Vajeshankar G. Ojha, and
TH. Von Schtscherbatskoi

V. Venkayya

E.W. West

Index

List of Plates

Other South-Indian Inscriptions 

Volume 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Vol. 4 - 8

Volume 9

Volume 10

Volume 11

Volume 12

Volume 13

Volume 14

Volume 15

Volume 16

Volume 17

Volume 18

Volume 19

Volume 20

Volume 22
Part 1

Volume 22
Part 2

Volume 23

Volume 24

Volume 26

Volume 27

Tiruvarur

Darasuram

Konerirajapuram

Tanjavur

Annual Reports 1935-1944

Annual Reports 1945- 1947

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 2, Part 2

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 7, Part 3

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 1

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 2

Epigraphica Indica

Epigraphia Indica Volume 3

Epigraphia
Indica Volume 4

Epigraphia Indica Volume 6

Epigraphia Indica Volume 7

Epigraphia Indica Volume 8

Epigraphia Indica Volume 27

Epigraphia Indica Volume 29

Epigraphia Indica Volume 30

Epigraphia Indica Volume 31

Epigraphia Indica Volume 32

Paramaras Volume 7, Part 2

Śilāhāras Volume 6, Part 2

Vākāṭakas Volume 5

Early Gupta Inscriptions

Archaeological Links

Archaeological-Survey of India

Pudukkottai

EPIGRAPHIA INDICA

No. 20.- SEMRA PLATES OF PARAMARDIDEVA ; [VIKRAMA-]SAMVAT 1223.

BY W. CARTELLIERI, PH.D.

The subjoined edition of this recently discovered inscription is based on ink-impressions which were taken by Dr. A. Führer and sent by him to Professor Bühler, who made them over to me for publication. Dr. Führer states that the original copper-plates were found in September 1892 at Semra, a village in the Bijawar State, Bundelkhand Agency, Central India, and 9 miles west of Shâhgaṛh, a police station in the Sâgar district of the Central Provinces, and were presented to the Lucknow Museum by the Maharaja of Bijawar through the Political Agent at Nowgong. The plates are three in number, measuring,─ to judge from the impressions,─ about 2′ 1½″ in breadth and about 1′ 7½″ in height, and joined by a plain ring, which passes through a hole at the top or bottom, respectively, of each plate. At the top of the first plate is a representation of the goddess Lakshmî, which divides the first five lines

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