The Indian Analyst
 

South Indian Inscriptions

 

 

Contents

Index

Introduction

Contents

Additions and Corrections

Images

Contents

Rev. J.E. Abbott

R.G. Bhandarkar

Prof. G. Buhler

W. Cartellieri

J.F. Fleet

E. Hultzsch

Prof. Kielhorn

Prof. Kielhorn, and
H. Krishna Sastri

H. Luders

G.V. Ramamurti

J. Ramayya

Vajeshankar G. Ojha, and
TH. Von Schtscherbatskoi

V. Venkayya

E.W. West

Index

List of Plates

Other South-Indian Inscriptions 

Volume 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Vol. 4 - 8

Volume 9

Volume 10

Volume 11

Volume 12

Volume 13

Volume 14

Volume 15

Volume 16

Volume 17

Volume 18

Volume 19

Volume 20

Volume 22
Part 1

Volume 22
Part 2

Volume 23

Volume 24

Volume 26

Volume 27

Tiruvarur

Darasuram

Konerirajapuram

Tanjavur

Annual Reports 1935-1944

Annual Reports 1945- 1947

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 2, Part 2

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 7, Part 3

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 1

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 2

Epigraphica Indica

Epigraphia Indica Volume 3

Epigraphia
Indica Volume 4

Epigraphia Indica Volume 6

Epigraphia Indica Volume 7

Epigraphia Indica Volume 8

Epigraphia Indica Volume 27

Epigraphia Indica Volume 29

Epigraphia Indica Volume 30

Epigraphia Indica Volume 31

Epigraphia Indica Volume 32

Paramaras Volume 7, Part 2

Śilāhāras Volume 6, Part 2

Vākāṭakas Volume 5

Early Gupta Inscriptions

Archaeological Links

Archaeological-Survey of India

Pudukkottai

EPIGRAPHIA INDICA

No. 24.- NADAGAM PLATES OF VAJRAHASTA ;
SAKA-SAMVAT 979.

BY G. V. RAMAMURTHI ; PARLAKIMEDI.

These plates were discovered about two years ago at Naḍagâm, a village in the Narasannapêṭa tâluka of the Gañjâm district, by one Sanku Appanna, a cultivator, while he was working in the field. It is believed by the villagers that the plates belonged to some Jaṅgams, a sect of Śaivas, who had been living in this locality until fifty years ago. Last year I received information of the discovery of these plates, and got them into my hands a few months ago. I sent them through Mr. Weir, the Collector of Gañjâm, to Dr. Hultzsch, who has permitted me to edit them in this Journal. The owner is reported to be willing to have the plates preserved in the Government Central Museum, Madras.

The set consists of five copper-plates, of which the first has been engraved only on the inner side ; the next three plates bear writing on both faces ; the last plate is left blank on both sides and serves only for the protection of the writing on the back of the fourth plate. Each plate measures about 8½″ by 4″ and has a hole to the proper right, through which a ring passes. This ring is about ½″ thick and about 4⅛″ in diameter. It had not yet been cut when the plates were sent to Dr. Hultzsch. Its two ends are soldered into the lower portion of a thick circular seal, on which is fixed an image of a bull couchant, 1½″ long and 1″ high, with the figures of a conch-shell and a chaurî to its proper right, the figures of a sword and an

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