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Thursday, October 17, 2013


The Indian Analyst


 

South Indian Inscriptions


 

EPIGRAPHIA INDICA

No. 6.- SALOTGI PILLAR INSCRIPTIONS.
BY PROFESSOR F. KIELHORN AND H. KRISHNA SASTRI.

The pillar which contains these inscriptions, was originally at Sâlôṭgi,[2] a large village six miles south-east of Iṇḍî, the chief town of the Iṇḍî tâlukâ of the Bijâpur district of the Bombay Presidency, and has now been placed in the chauḍi at Iṇḍî. A translation of one of the inscriptions (the one here called A) has been published, with a lithograph of the greater part of the text, by the late Mr. S. P. Pandit, in the Indian Antiquary, Vol. I. p. 205 ff. We now edit these inscriptions from impressions which have been kindly supplied to us by Dr. Fleet.

The pillar is inscribed on all its four faces. On the front or first face, above the writing, are some sculptures : towards the top a liṅga, and below it a cow and calf, and something else which has been defaced. The first face of the pillar contains 32 lines of writing in Nâgarî characters and, below them, 5 lines in Old-Kanarese characters, covering a space of 3′ 5″ high by from 1′ 4″ to 1′ 4½″ broad. The second face contains 30 lines of writing in Nâgarî characters and, below them, 8 lines in Old-Kanarese characters, covering a space of 3′ 8″ high by from 9″ to 10″ broad. The third face contains 21 lines of writing in Nâgarî characters and, below them, 4 lines in Old-Kanarese characters, covering a space of about 3′ 2″ high by 1′ 4″ broad.

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[2] See the Bombay Gazetteer, Vol. XXIII. p. 674.

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