The Indian Analyst
 

South Indian Inscriptions

 

 

Contents

Index

Introduction

Contents

Additions and Corrections

Images

Contents

Dr. Bhandarkar

J.F. Fleet

Prof. E. Hultzsch

Prof. F. Kielhorn

Rev. F. Kittel

H. Krishna Sastri

H. Luders

Vienna

V. Venkayya

Index

List of Plates

Other South-Indian Inscriptions 

Volume 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Vol. 4 - 8

Volume 9

Volume 10

Volume 11

Volume 12

Volume 13

Volume 14

Volume 15

Volume 16

Volume 17

Volume 18

Volume 19

Volume 20

Volume 22
Part 1

Volume 22
Part 2

Volume 23

Volume 24

Volume 26

Volume 27

Tiruvarur

Darasuram

Konerirajapuram

Tanjavur

Annual Reports 1935-1944

Annual Reports 1945- 1947

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 2, Part 2

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 7, Part 3

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 1

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 2

Epigraphica Indica

Epigraphia Indica Volume 3

Epigraphia
Indica Volume 4

Epigraphia Indica Volume 6

Epigraphia Indica Volume 7

Epigraphia Indica Volume 8

Epigraphia Indica Volume 27

Epigraphia Indica Volume 29

Epigraphia Indica Volume 30

Epigraphia Indica Volume 31

Epigraphia Indica Volume 32

Paramaras Volume 7, Part 2

Śilāhāras Volume 6, Part 2

Vākāṭakas Volume 5

Early Gupta Inscriptions

Archaeological Links

Archaeological-Survey of India

Pudukkottai

ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS

Page

57,

note 9,

line 3,─

for Vol. V., read Vol. III.

66,

line 9,

for

Nolambâdhirâja, read Noḷambâdhirâja.

67,

note 4,

line 3.─

for –Permmânaḍigal=, read –Permmânaḍigaḷ=.

68,

” 6,

” 2,─

for Permanadi, read Permanaḍi.

69,

line 11,

for

Kyâtanahalli, read Kyâtanahaḷḷi.

70,

8,─

for Kisukâd, read Kisukâḍ.

83

16,─

for king, read kings.

93

7,

─ for Maḷapas, read Malapas.

’ 105, verse 1, and note 8.─ Professor Kielhorn has now fully accounted for the description of Vishṇu here as Puraṁdara-nandana, “ son of Indra ;” see Göttinger Nachrichten, 1900, p. 350 ff., where he has shewn that it may be traced back to the use of Âkhaṇḍala-sûnu, in the Kirâtârjunîya, i. 24, to denote primarily Arjuna, “ the son of Indra,” and secondarily Vishṇu, “ the younger brother of Indra.” As he has said, in conclusion ;─ “ If a poet like Bhâravi could use Âkhaṇḍala-sûnu as a name of the god Vishṇu, we cannot wonder that some petty poet should have employed its exact synonym Purandara-nandana, in just the same sense.”─ J. F. F.

” 110, note 7.─ Mr. H. Krishna Sastri aptly identifies Symamdary with Siṁhâdri, i.e. Siṁhâchalam in the Vizagapatam district ; compare Mr. Venkayya’s Annual Report for 1899-1900, p. 27.

” 111, line 7 f. from bottom.─ Mr. H. Krishna Sastri states that Pâranandi Bhâskarâvadhânin at Nellore possesses a complete copy of the Chandrikâ, a commentary on Kṛishṇa- miśra’s Prabôdhachandrôdaya by Nâdiṇḍla-Gôpa, the sister’s son of Sâḷva-Timma. The colophon of the first act reads as follows :─ Iti śrîmad-râjâdhirâja-râja- paramêśvara-śrî-Vîrapratâpa-śrî-Kṛishṇarâya-mahârâya-sâṁmrâjya-dhuraṁdha r a- śrî-Sâḷva-Timmarâya-daṁḍanâyaka-bhâginêya-Nâdiṁḍla-Gôpa-maṁtr i ś ê k h a r a - virachitâyâṁ Prabôdhachaṁdrôdaya-vyâkhyâyâṁ Chaṁdrik-âkhyâyâṁ prathamô= ṁkaḥ ||

” 113, line 3 from bottom,─ for Môtupalle, read Môṭupalle.

” 117, note 11.─ Vṛitrabhid-aśman is synonymous with indra-nîla, ‘ a sapphire.’

” 128, ” 6, line 4,─ for –Kṛishṇu, read -Kṛishṇa.

” 131, verse 33, line 3 f.─ Read : “ If not, why (dost thou) whose emblem is the Garuda (assume) this (ensign of the hawk) ? ”

” 132, verse 42,─ for “ whose deep compassion with heroes was,” read “ whose heroism and compassion were.”

” 135, line 20,─ for saṁvachchhaa, read saṁvachchhara.

” 157, text line 191,─ for (Sanskrit)º, read (Sanskrit)º.

” 169, the last line, and page 170, first line ; and throughout subsequent reference.─ I have recently had occasion to look up Mr. H. H. Dhruva’s article on the records of A.D. 915, in the Jour. German Or. Soc. Vol. XL. p. 322 ff. His introductory remarks shew that these two records were obtained at Bagumrâ. And they ought, therefore, to be referred to as “ the Bagumrâ plates of A.D. 915,” and not by a title connecting them with Nausârî as their find-place. His remarks further shew that the seal of each of these two records presents, not only the god Śiva as stated by Dr. R. G. Bhandarkar in Jour. Bo. Br. R. As. Soc. Vol. XVIII. p. 253, but also a svastika and a Gaṇapati and the legend śrîman-Nityavarsha.─ J. F. F.

” 169, note 14.─ Cancel the words “ while his own illustrious queen was prospering.” The correct translation of this passage is given in South-Ind. Inscr. Vol. II. p. 92.

” 185, line 7 from bottom,─ for –Bassappa read –Basappa.

” ” note 14,─ for 7, 8, read 6, 7.

” 189, ” 1.─ It might have been added here that Ratnâvalôka occurs as a biruda of the Mahâsâmanta Bappuvarasa in the Mahâkûṭa inscription of A.D. 934 : see Ind. Ant.

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