The Indian Analyst
 

South Indian Inscriptions

 

 

Contents

Index

Introduction

Contents

List of Plates

Additions and Corrections

Images

Contents

Bhandarkar

T. Bloch

J. F. Fleet

Gopinatha Rao

T. A. Gopinatha Rao and G. Venkoba Rao

Hira Lal

E. Hultzsch

F. Kielhorn

H. Krishna Sastri

H. Luders

Narayanasvami Ayyar

R. Pischel

J. Ramayya

E. Senart

V. Venkayya

G. Venkoba Rao

J. PH. Vogel

Index

Other South-Indian Inscriptions 

Volume 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Vol. 4 - 8

Volume 9

Volume 10

Volume 11

Volume 12

Volume 13

Volume 14

Volume 15

Volume 16

Volume 17

Volume 18

Volume 19

Volume 20

Volume 22
Part 1

Volume 22
Part 2

Volume 23

Volume 24

Volume 26

Volume 27

Tiruvarur

Darasuram

Konerirajapuram

Tanjavur

Annual Reports 1935-1944

Annual Reports 1945- 1947

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 2, Part 2

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 7, Part 3

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 1

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 2

Epigraphica Indica

Epigraphia Indica Volume 3

Epigraphia
Indica Volume 4

Epigraphia Indica Volume 6

Epigraphia Indica Volume 7

Epigraphia Indica Volume 8

Epigraphia Indica Volume 27

Epigraphia Indica Volume 29

Epigraphia Indica Volume 30

Epigraphia Indica Volume 31

Epigraphia Indica Volume 32

Paramaras Volume 7, Part 2

Śilāhāras Volume 6, Part 2

Vākāṭakas Volume 5

Early Gupta Inscriptions

Archaeological Links

Archaeological-Survey of India

Pudukkottai

ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS

Page 126, note 3, ll. 5 to 12.─ [Professor Hultzsch has critically edited the three Udiyâvara inscriptions quoted here (Nos. 108. 98 and 97 of the Government Epigraphist’s collection for 1901) on pp. 18, 22 and 23 of Epigraphia Indica, Vol. IX., respectively. In the light of his remarks some alterations in this note appear necessary. In numbers 97 and 98 the alternative forms Ponvulcha and Udayapura also occur. The word nakara, which I took to mean ‘ trading classes ’ in both these inscriptions, is taken by Professor Hultzsch as bring placed in apposition to Pombulchada and Udayapurada, and as meaning ‘ city.’ In No. 108 the attribute Paṭṭi-oḍeyon, which I took as applying to Śvêtavâhana, probably refers to a Śaiva priest. It was not Svêtavâhana that fell in battle, but a servant of the Âḷuva prince Raṇasâgara, named Kâmakôḍa.─ H. K. S.]
” 127, note 2, last line,─ for leunmolested read unmolested.
” 128, l. 16 from bottom,─ for decidedly read decidedly.
” 138, No. 11.─ In a letter dated Nagpur, 4th October 1906, Mr. Hiranand communicated to the Editor the following extract from a letter of the Deputy Commissioner, Sambalpur District, to the Superintendent, Nagpur Museum, dated 15th September 1889 :─ “ The plate (viz. the plates edited on p. 138 ff) was found by Dusti Kulta, resident of Satlama in the Barpali Zamindari, in June 1897 (read : 1887 ?). He found it under a stone while he was constructing the embankment of his field near the Gandapara.” Mr. Hiranand adds :─ “ From this it is evident that the Satallamâ of the inscription is the very place where the plates were found.”
” 147, paragraph 5,─ for Multagi is represented ……. as forming the eastern boundary ” read Multagi figures …… among the boundaries.”
” 173, paragraph 2, l. 5,─ for Pushyavnddhi read Pushyavuddhi.
” 183, l. 11,─ for southern read northern.─ Note the form of rtha in ll. 15 and 31 of the Inscription.
” 200, 1. 12 from bottom.─ With khattaka Mr. Krishna Sastri compares the Kannaḍa gaddige and the Hindî gaddî, ‘ a throne.’
” 204, 1. 14 from bottom.─ With âshṭâhikâ Mr. Krishna Sastri compares the ashṭâhnîka of the Southern Jainas ; see p. 137, note 4.
” 216, v. 37.─ Regarding this verse see Prof. Kielhorn’s remarks in the Journ. R. As. Soc. 1907, p. 175 ff.
” 216, v. 42.─ Mr. Krishna Sastri remarks :─ “ I suggest that the word (Sanskrit) be taken as an apposition referring to Yaśôdâ, and not independently as is done in the translation. I cannot understand how Kṛishṇa’s splendour was augmented by his mother. (Sanskrit).”
” 219, text line 2 f.─ Prof. Kielhorn supplies (Sanskrit).
” 234, ll. 4 and 7.─ In accordance with Vol. IX. p. 50, read Karmâka-râshṭra and Kammâka-râshtṛa (without ).─ The same correction has to be made on p. 235, text lines 14 and 16, p.236, ll. 14 and 17, and p. 238, l. 8 from bottom.
” 295, note 1, l. 7,─ for Tiruvaymoli read Tiruvâymoli.
” 305, note 1, line 1,─ for “ Sudarśanâchârya who wrote ” read “ Sudarśanâchârya, also called Nainâra, who was the son of Vâgvijaya, and who wrote ”
” 307, l. 2.─ On Madras Museum ” add a footnote :─“ [No 16 of Appendix A. in the Annual Report for 1905-06 of the Assistant Archæological Superintendent for Epigraphy, Southern Circle─ V. V.] ”
” 318, 1. 16,─ for “ three verses ” read “ three Sanskṛit verses.”
” 318, 1. 7 from bottom,─ after The second inscription,” insert which is in Tamil, and.”

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