The Indian Analyst
 

South Indian Inscriptions

 

 

Contents

Index

Introduction

Contents

List of Plates

Additions and Corrections

Images

Contents

Bhandarkar

T. Bloch

J. F. Fleet

Gopinatha Rao

T. A. Gopinatha Rao and G. Venkoba Rao

Hira Lal

E. Hultzsch

F. Kielhorn

H. Krishna Sastri

H. Luders

Narayanasvami Ayyar

R. Pischel

J. Ramayya

E. Senart

V. Venkayya

G. Venkoba Rao

J. PH. Vogel

Index

Other South-Indian Inscriptions 

Volume 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Vol. 4 - 8

Volume 9

Volume 10

Volume 11

Volume 12

Volume 13

Volume 14

Volume 15

Volume 16

Volume 17

Volume 18

Volume 19

Volume 20

Volume 22
Part 1

Volume 22
Part 2

Volume 23

Volume 24

Volume 26

Volume 27

Tiruvarur

Darasuram

Konerirajapuram

Tanjavur

Annual Reports 1935-1944

Annual Reports 1945- 1947

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 2, Part 2

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 7, Part 3

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 1

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 2

Epigraphica Indica

Epigraphia Indica Volume 3

Epigraphia
Indica Volume 4

Epigraphia Indica Volume 6

Epigraphia Indica Volume 7

Epigraphia Indica Volume 8

Epigraphia Indica Volume 27

Epigraphia Indica Volume 29

Epigraphia Indica Volume 30

Epigraphia Indica Volume 31

Epigraphia Indica Volume 32

Paramaras Volume 7, Part 2

Śilāhāras Volume 6, Part 2

Vākāṭakas Volume 5

Early Gupta Inscriptions

Archaeological Links

Archaeological-Survey of India

Pudukkottai

EPIGRAPHIA INDICA

No. 3.─ MADRAS MUSEUM PLATES OF VEMA ;

A.D. 1345.

BY. J. RAMAYYA, B.A., B.L.

This inscription is engraved on five copper-plates which are deposited in the Madras Museum, and I edit it from ink-impressions kindly furnished to me by Prof. Hultzsch. The plates are engraved on both sides, except the first plate which is engraved on one side only. The ring and seal are missing. The letters are bold and legible. The characters are of the old Telugu type. The language is Sanskṛit, except the portion describing the boundaries of the village of Âtukûru, which is in Telugu.

The inscription opens with an invocation to the boar-incarnation of Vishṇu (verse 1), whose feet gave birth to the fourth caste (v. 2). In that caste was born Vêmaya, the founder of a family (vaṁśa-kartâ, v. 3). To him was born the great hero Kômaṭi-Prôla (v. 4), whose wife was Annemâmbâ (v. 5). To Kômaṭi-Prôla, Annemâmbâ bore five sons :─ Mâcha, Vêma, Doḍḍaya, Annaya and Mallaya (v. 6). Of these Vêma ruled the earth (v. 8). He was the torrent of a mighty river to the trees which were rebellious neighbouring kings, the full-moon to the water-lilies which were friendly kings, the wind to the cotton which was the mad manne chiefs,[4] a very Agastya to the ocean which was the Mlêchchhas[5] (v. 9), and bore the biruda Râyachêkôlugaṇḍa (v. 10). King Vêma restored all the agrahâras of Brâhmaṇas, which had been taken away by the wicked Mlêchchha kings from (the time of) king Vîra-Rudra of the Kâkati-vaṁśa (v. 12). King Vêma, surnamed Śrî-Pallava-Trinêtra, was a bee on the lotus-flowers which were the feet of the preceptor named Ghôḍerâya-Gaṅga[6] (v. 13). Vêma’s

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[4] The reference seems to be to the hill-chiefs whom Vêma vanquished.
[5] I.e. the Muḥammadans.
[6] This person seems to have been the family Guru of the Reḍḍis. He is referred to in Śrînâtha’s Bhîmakhaṇḍam and Kâśîkhaṇḍam as Ghôḍerâya-Bhîmaya-Guru and Ghôrarâya-Bhîmêśvara, respectively.

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