The Indian Analyst
 

South Indian Inscriptions

 

 

Contents

Index

Introduction

Contents

Additions and Corrections

Images

Contents

Dr. Bhandarkar

J.F. Fleet

Prof. E. Hultzsch

Prof. F. Kielhorn

Rev. F. Kittel

H. Krishna Sastri

H. Luders

Vienna

V. Venkayya

Index

List of Plates

Other South-Indian Inscriptions 

Volume 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Vol. 4 - 8

Volume 9

Volume 10

Volume 11

Volume 12

Volume 13

Volume 14

Volume 15

Volume 16

Volume 17

Volume 18

Volume 19

Volume 20

Volume 22
Part 1

Volume 22
Part 2

Volume 23

Volume 24

Volume 26

Volume 27

Tiruvarur

Darasuram

Konerirajapuram

Tanjavur

Annual Reports 1935-1944

Annual Reports 1945- 1947

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 2, Part 2

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 7, Part 3

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 1

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 2

Epigraphica Indica

Epigraphia Indica Volume 3

Epigraphia
Indica Volume 4

Epigraphia Indica Volume 6

Epigraphia Indica Volume 7

Epigraphia Indica Volume 8

Epigraphia Indica Volume 27

Epigraphia Indica Volume 29

Epigraphia Indica Volume 30

Epigraphia Indica Volume 31

Epigraphia Indica Volume 32

Paramaras Volume 7, Part 2

Śilāhāras Volume 6, Part 2

Vākāṭakas Volume 5

Early Gupta Inscriptions

Archaeological Links

Archaeological-Survey of India

Pudukkottai

EPIGRAPHIA INDICA

No. 28.- PLATES OF DANTIVARMAN OF GUJARAT ; SAKA-SAMVAT 789.

BY D. R. BHANDARKAR, M. A.

These copper plates were brought to my father, Dr. R. G. Bhandarkar, from Gujarât ; but he does not know the name of the village where they were found. The plates are three in number, each measuring about 1′ 1″ by 9¼″. Their edges are raised into rims for the protection of the writing. The first plate is inscribed on one side only, the remaining two being engraved on both sides. They are strung on a copper ring which measures about 3½″ in diameter and is about ⅜″ thick. The ring had not yet been cut when the plates were sent to Dr. Hultzsch. The ends of the ring are secured in the base of circular seal, measuring about 1⅞″ in diameter and bearing, in high relief on a countersunk surface, a much corroded figure of Garuḍa, squatting and facing to the full front. The engraving is clear, bold and deep, but not well executed. Very often the letters are not fully engraved, and in a good many places they are drawn carelessly.─ The language is Sanskṛit throughout. There can be no doubt that the kâṁsâr has engraved the original document without understanding it, as will be seen from the numerous mistakes pointed out in the footnotes.
Allowing for the misspellings and inaccuracies due to an unskilled engraver, there are certain solecisms for which the official who drew up the grant must be held responsible. There is one compound in line 55, which cannot be justified by the rules of grammar. Other grammatical mistakes may be noticed in such instances as Sarthâtailâṭakîya-dvichatvâriṁśaty-ântarggataº in line 59, -mahâparvvam=uddiśya in line 66, and so forth.─ As regards lexicography, attention may be drawn (1) to the word vâsâpaka[6] (l. 58) which occurs in the list of the officials and functionaries to whom the royal grantor addresses himself, and (2) to the term Talaprahâri (l. 57) which appears to have been an appellation of Dantivarman.[7]─ In respect of orthography, it deserves to be noted (1) that the rules of saṁdhi

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[6] [Compare Ind. Ant. Vol. XIII. p. 69, note 31.─ E. H.]
[7] [Note also sênabhôgika (l. 81), which is an older form of śânabhôga, sênabôva, etc., ‘ the clerk of a village or of some village.’ (Kittel’s Kannaḍa-English Dictionary).─ E. H.]

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