The Indian Analyst
 

South Indian Inscriptions

 

 

Contents

Index

Introduction

Contents

Additions and Corrections

Images

Contents

Dr. Bhandarkar

J.F. Fleet

Prof. E. Hultzsch

Prof. F. Kielhorn

Rev. F. Kittel

H. Krishna Sastri

H. Luders

Vienna

V. Venkayya

Index

List of Plates

Other South-Indian Inscriptions 

Volume 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Vol. 4 - 8

Volume 9

Volume 10

Volume 11

Volume 12

Volume 13

Volume 14

Volume 15

Volume 16

Volume 17

Volume 18

Volume 19

Volume 20

Volume 22
Part 1

Volume 22
Part 2

Volume 23

Volume 24

Volume 26

Volume 27

Tiruvarur

Darasuram

Konerirajapuram

Tanjavur

Annual Reports 1935-1944

Annual Reports 1945- 1947

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 2, Part 2

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 7, Part 3

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 1

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 2

Epigraphica Indica

Epigraphia Indica Volume 3

Epigraphia
Indica Volume 4

Epigraphia Indica Volume 6

Epigraphia Indica Volume 7

Epigraphia Indica Volume 8

Epigraphia Indica Volume 27

Epigraphia Indica Volume 29

Epigraphia Indica Volume 30

Epigraphia Indica Volume 31

Epigraphia Indica Volume 32

Paramaras Volume 7, Part 2

Śilāhāras Volume 6, Part 2

Vākāṭakas Volume 5

Early Gupta Inscriptions

Archaeological Links

Archaeological-Survey of India

Pudukkottai

EPIGRAPHIA INDICA

No. 26.─ TSANDAVOLU INSCRIPTION OF BUDDHARAJA ;
SAKA-SAMVAT 1093.

BY. E. HULTZSCH, PH.D.

This inscription (No. 249 of 1897) is engraved on three faces of a pillar opposite the Liṅgôdbhavasvâmin temple at Tsandavôlu in the Rêpalle tâluka of the Kistna district. The alphabet is Telugu. The inscription consists of 13 Sanskṛit verses, a passage in Telugu prose (ll. 56 to 81), and two Sanskṛit verses at the end.

The inscription is dated at the winter-solstice (Saumyâyana, v. 13, or Uttarâyaṇa, l. 70 f.) in Śaka-Saṁvat 1093 (in numerical words, v. 13, and in figures, l. 70) and records the grant of a filed at Nâdiṇḍla (v. 13 and l. 72) and of a lamp to the Śiva temple of Paṇḍîśa (v. 13) or Paṇḍîśvara (ll. 69 and 79) at Dhanadapura (v. 13), Dhanadaprôlu (l. 69) or Dhanadavrôlu (l. 78 f.) in Velanâṇḍu (v. 13). Nâdiṇḍla is the modern Nâdeṇḍla in the Narasarâvupêṭa tâluka of the Kistna district.[2] As stated before,[3] Dhanadapura or Dhanadaprôlu is the modern Tsandavôlu, which was the capital of the chiefs of Velanâṇḍu.[4] According to an inscription which is now built into the roof of the Liṅgôdbhavasvâmin temple, the temple of Paṇḍîśvara was named after one of the chiefs of Velanâṇḍu.[5].

The donor of this inscription was Buddharâja (vv. 9, 12 and 13) or, in Telugu, the Mahâmaṇḍalêśvara Koṇḍapaḍmaṭi-Buddarâja (l. 67 f.), who bore the surnames Aniyaṅka-Bhîma (l. 60 f.), Eladâyasiṁha (l. 61 f.), and ‘ the lion of the mountain─ the Durjaya family’[6]

__________________________________
[2] Above, Vol. IV. p. 37, and Vol. VI. pp. 111 and 115.
[3] Above, Vol. IV. Additions and Corrections, p. v.
[4] Ibid. p. 33.
[5] Above, Vol. V. p. 151.
[6] This was also a surname of the chief Nambaya ; see page 227 above. And the Kâkatîya king Gaṇapati traced his descent to an ancestor named Durjaya ; above, Vol. V. p. 142. Though Gaṇapati claims to be a descendant of the Sun, Manu and Raghu (Ind. Ant. Vol. XXI. p. 201, and above, Vol. V. p. 142), the Kâkatîyas must have belonged to the Śûdra caste, because they intermarried with Śûdra chiefs (above, Vol. III. p. 94, and Vol. VI. p. 147). In the Yenamadala inscription, which chronicles the marriage of Gaṇapâmbâ to
Bêta, both parties preserve a discreet silence regarding their Śûdra descent.

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