The Indian Analyst
 

South Indian Inscriptions

 

 

Contents

Index

Introduction

Contents

Additions and Corrections

Images

Contents

Dr. Bhandarkar

J.F. Fleet

Prof. E. Hultzsch

Prof. F. Kielhorn

Rev. F. Kittel

H. Krishna Sastri

H. Luders

Vienna

V. Venkayya

Index

List of Plates

Other South-Indian Inscriptions 

Volume 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Vol. 4 - 8

Volume 9

Volume 10

Volume 11

Volume 12

Volume 13

Volume 14

Volume 15

Volume 16

Volume 17

Volume 18

Volume 19

Volume 20

Volume 22
Part 1

Volume 22
Part 2

Volume 23

Volume 24

Volume 26

Volume 27

Tiruvarur

Darasuram

Konerirajapuram

Tanjavur

Annual Reports 1935-1944

Annual Reports 1945- 1947

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 2, Part 2

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 7, Part 3

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 1

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 2

Epigraphica Indica

Epigraphia Indica Volume 3

Epigraphia
Indica Volume 4

Epigraphia Indica Volume 6

Epigraphia Indica Volume 7

Epigraphia Indica Volume 8

Epigraphia Indica Volume 27

Epigraphia Indica Volume 29

Epigraphia Indica Volume 30

Epigraphia Indica Volume 31

Epigraphia Indica Volume 32

Paramaras Volume 7, Part 2

Śilāhāras Volume 6, Part 2

Vākāṭakas Volume 5

Early Gupta Inscriptions

Archaeological Links

Archaeological-Survey of India

Pudukkottai

EPIGRAPHIA INDICA

No. 22.- KONDAVIDU PILLAR INSCRIPTION OF THE TIME OF
KRISHNARAYA OF VIJAYANAGARA ; SAKA-SAMVAT 1442.

BY H. LÜDERS, PH.D. ; GÖTTINGEN.

Inked estampages of this inscription[4] were sent to me by Dr. Hultzsch through Prof. Kielhorn with the following note : “ On four faces of a pillar near the agrahâra at Koṇḍavîḍu. The pillar is supported on two sides (north and south) by stones which made it impossible to copy and ink the top lines of the inscription in full.”[5]

The inscription contains 166 lines of writing. The average size of the letters is ¾″.─ The alphabet is Telugu and, with few exceptions, resembles that of the Maṅgalagiri inscription.[6] Several times ka appears here in the old form ; see e.g. ll. 3, 6, 15, 16, 30, 43, 118, 145 (ka) ; 27, 111 () ; 142, 146 (ki) ; 11 () ; 17, 157 (ku) ; 7 (kṛi) ; 11 () 142 (kku), while such forms as ka in ll. 7, 64, ku in l. 46, in l. 92, kau in l. 39, may be called transitional. The sha occasionally shows the younger form occurring also in the Vânapalli plates ; see ll. 69 (sha) ; 24 (shṭha) ; 33 (kshmâ). Ḷa appears throughout in the form of the Biṭraguṇṭa grant and the Vânapalli plates. in dha the ottu is used only in dhi in l. 19 (vârâṁ nidhir), dhî in l. 72, and in the subscript dh of dhdha in l. 34. But in gha and ḍha it is used quite regularly, and in bha it is only missing in bhû, bhu, bhô in l. 163, and in bhṛi in ll. 5, 59 and bhyâ in l. 7 on account of the subscript sign. In the groups rma, rya and rva the full sign of r is generally used, but in ryû in l.
20 and rmmyai in ll. 28, 92 it appears in the secondary forms, as in all other combinations, and in rvê in l. 163 and rma in l. 165 it is expressed both by the full and the secondary sign.─ The language is Sanskṛit from the beginning to l. 108, and again from the middle of l. 162 to the end. The rest is in Telugu.[7] With exception of the concluding words śrî śrî śrî in l. 108, the Sanskṛit portion is in verse, whereas the Telugu portion is in prose throughout.─ The orthography calls for few remarks. In the interior of a word k, g, ch, t, d and v, if followed by a vowel, are generally doubled after anusvâra ; exceptions are śaṁkur (l. 20), -âṁkuraḥ (l. 21), -âṁka (l. 34), saptâṁgô- (l. 29), paṁchâ- (l. 107), maṁdâra (l. 12), Maiṁdavôluṁ (l. 102), and several words in the Telugu portion (see for ṁk ll. 127, 145 ; ṁg ll. 113, 115, 130, 141, 156, 158 ; ṁch ll. 117, 118, 119, 145, 153, 157 ; ṁd ll. 111, 121, 135). also is doubled in śrîkhaṁḍḍa (l. 76), Koṁḍḍavîṭî(ṭî) (ll. 98, 111), and dh in baṁdhdhushu (l. 40), -âruṁdhdhatî (l. 41) ; compare also chiṁttapaṁdhdhu for ºpaṁḍu in l. 134, tr in written ttr

____________________________________________________________________________________
[4] No. 242 of the Government Epigraphist’s collection for the year 1892.
[5] This defect is not very serious, as the few missing aksharas in ll. 87-89 can easily be replaced from other inscriptions.
[6] See my remarks, above, p. 108 f.
[7] The text and translation of the Telugu portion have been contributed by Mr. H. Krishna Sastri.

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