The Indian Analyst
 

North Indian Inscriptions

 

 

Contents

Introduction

Contents

List of Plates

Additions And Corrections

Images

Miscellaneous Inscriptions

Texts And Translations

Inscriptions of The Kalachuris of Sarayupara

Inscriptions of The Kalachuris of Ratanpur

Inscriptions of The Kalachuris of Raipur

Additional Inscriptions

Appendix

Supplementary Inscriptions

Index

Other South-Indian Inscriptions 

Volume 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Vol. 4 - 8

Volume 9

Volume 10

Volume 11

Volume 12

Volume 13

Volume 14

Volume 15

Volume 16

Volume 17

Volume 18

Volume 19

Volume 20

Volume 22
Part 1

Volume 22
Part 2

Volume 23

Volume 24

Volume 26

Volume 27

Tiruvarur

Darasuram

Konerirajapuram

Tanjavur

Annual Reports 1935-1944

Annual Reports 1945- 1947

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 2, Part 2

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 7, Part 3

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 1

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 2

Epigraphica Indica

Epigraphia Indica Volume 3

Epigraphia
Indica Volume 4

Epigraphia Indica Volume 6

Epigraphia Indica Volume 7

Epigraphia Indica Volume 8

Epigraphia Indica Volume 27

Epigraphia Indica Volume 29

Epigraphia Indica Volume 30

Epigraphia Indica Volume 31

Epigraphia Indica Volume 32

Paramaras Volume 7, Part 2

Śilāhāras Volume 6, Part 2

Vākāṭakas Volume 5

Early Gupta Inscriptions

Archaeological Links

Archaeological-Survey of India

Pudukkottai

INSCRIPTIONS OF THE KALACHURIS OF RATANPUR

RATANPUR STONE INSCRIPTION OF PRITHVIDEVA II : YEAR 910

TRANSLATION

Success ! Ōṁ! Adoration to Brahman!
[For a translation of verses 1-10, see above, pp. 428-29.]

(Verse 11) From him was born Pṛithvideva (II) as a cub is from a lion; who, having the strong body of a lion, destroyed his enemies like a troop of elephants.

(V. 12) In the gōtra of Chandrātrēya, with the three pravaras Chandra, Atri and Spāvana¹, there was an excellent Brāhmaṇa bearing the name Mihirasvāmin.

(V. 13) He had a son named Dēvaśarman, most proficient in policy. He too had two we-known sons Sīlaṇa and Pīthana.

(V. 14) (Their) younger (brother) was Lakaṇa as Lakshmaṇa was of Rāma. All of them were religious-minded and high-souled, and were fond of gods and Brāhmaṇas.

(V. 15) To them this village Buḍubuḍū in the Madhya-maṇḍala recorded in (this) copper-charter (was granted) by the king on the akshaya-tṛitīyā.

(Here follow twelve benedictive and imprecatory verses.)

(V. 28) There lived here the wise and illustrious Kīrtidhara, the moon which made the night-lotuses of the Vāstavya family bloom, (and) who owned the village named Jaḍēra. His learned son, known as the illustrious Vatsarāja, wrote (on these plates of ) copper.

(Line 36) Engraved by Chāndārka. (In) the year 905, on Tuesday, the sixth (lunar) day of the bright (fortnight) of Āśvina.

Seal
The King, the illustrious Pṛithvīdēva.

No. 95 ; (No PLATE)
RATANPUR STONE INSCRIPTION OF PRITHVIDEVA II: KALACHURI YEAR 910

THIS inscription was first brought to notice by Sir A. Cunningham who gave a transcript of its date accompanied by a photozincograph of the corresponding portion of the record in his Archæological Survey of India Reports, Vol. XVII (1881-82), p.76 and pl. xx. The record was subsequently noticed very briefly by Rai Bahadur Hiralal with the remark that 'it is fragmentary and is almost wholly effaced'.² It is edited here for the first time from the original stone which is now deposited in the Central Museum, Nagpur.?

The inscription is incised on a slab of black stone which is said to have been found at Ratanpur in the Bilaspur District of Madhya Pradesh. It is fragmentary. The extant portion, which covers a space 2' I'' broad and I' 6½'' high, contains twenty-eight lines. About three lines containing two verses and a portion of the third have been broken away from the top, but nothing has been lost from the sides and the bottom of the stone. The inscription has, however, been almost completely obliterated on the middle of the surface of the stone, only about half a dozen aksharas on either side being still legible in lines 3-23. The preserved portion shows that the present record had many verses in common with three other inscriptions, but as these latter also are fragmentary, they do not afford much help in the restoration of the lost aksharas.
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1 Rather, Pāvana (fire). See above, p. 477, n. 8.
2 I. C. P. B. (first ed.), p. 121; (second ed.), p. 134.
3 Its estampages are not sufficiently good for plating.
4 Viz., Nos. 84, 85 and 87, above.

 

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