The Indian Analyst
 

North Indian Inscriptions

 

 

Contents

Introduction

Contents

List of Plates

Additions And Corrections

Images

Miscellaneous Inscriptions

Texts And Translations

Inscriptions of The Kalachuris of Sarayupara

Inscriptions of The Kalachuris of Ratanpur

Inscriptions of The Kalachuris of Raipur

Additional Inscriptions

Appendix

Supplementary Inscriptions

Index

Other South-Indian Inscriptions 

Volume 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Vol. 4 - 8

Volume 9

Volume 10

Volume 11

Volume 12

Volume 13

Volume 14

Volume 15

Volume 16

Volume 17

Volume 18

Volume 19

Volume 20

Volume 22
Part 1

Volume 22
Part 2

Volume 23

Volume 24

Volume 26

Volume 27

Tiruvarur

Darasuram

Konerirajapuram

Tanjavur

Annual Reports 1935-1944

Annual Reports 1945- 1947

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 2, Part 2

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 7, Part 3

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 1

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 2

Epigraphica Indica

Epigraphia Indica Volume 3

Epigraphia
Indica Volume 4

Epigraphia Indica Volume 6

Epigraphia Indica Volume 7

Epigraphia Indica Volume 8

Epigraphia Indica Volume 27

Epigraphia Indica Volume 29

Epigraphia Indica Volume 30

Epigraphia Indica Volume 31

Epigraphia Indica Volume 32

Paramaras Volume 7, Part 2

Śilāhāras Volume 6, Part 2

Vākāṭakas Volume 5

Early Gupta Inscriptions

Archaeological Links

Archaeological-Survey of India

Pudukkottai

INSCRIPTIONS OF THE KALACHURIS OF SARAYUPARA

valour resembling the radiance of Aurva; . . . . . who, a wise man, became known over the whole earth by his fame . . . . .

(V. 19) The son of that king was the lord of the earth, the illustrious Bhīmaṭa (I) of noble birth, the sole store of the multitude of excellences (used for) comparison, the sharp edge of whose sword was adept in the guileless destruction [of his enemies].

(V. 20) . . . . . there was the illustrious Lakshmaṇa (II), who had mastered the entire skill of bowmanship; to whom, on account of his excellences, resorted the title of Rājaputra which passed over hundreds of other princes.

(V. 21) His son was Śivarāja (II), who, like Śiva, was conversant with all matters . . . . . confusion in the cities of his enemies on the earth.

(V. 22) [From him] was born . . . . . the wish-fulfilling tree (and) the crest- jewel of kings whose fame was sung in the three worlds.

(V. 23) That prosperous king had a lawful wife named Bhūdā, who being resplendent and descended from noble families on both sides, won his heart ,(and) who resembled a female swan, casting shade with both her extremely white wings and going to the Mānasa lake.

(V. 24) From her . . . . . . [was born] Lakshmaṇarāja (III) in (this) world . . . . .

(V. 25) By whom the earth ( was strewn) with pearls scattered from the large frontal globes of the enemies' elephants cleft by the hard strokes of (his) sword on the battle-fields and mixed with the dropping tears resembling saffron. . . . . . .

(V. 26) [He married] the daughter (of . . . . . ) named Kāñchanā . . . . . .

(V. 27) On her (i.e. Kāñchanā) that king, whose foot-stool was brightened by a multitude of the crest-jewels of a host of enemies bowing to him, begot the illustrious Bhīmaṭa (II) who, winning fame by his great prowess, became worthy of him. . . . .

(V. 28) . . . . . . they describe (his) arrow . . . .

(V. 29) [He was] . . . . the desire of the wish-fulfilling trees, the Mēru mountain that is dug day by day. . . . . . . .

(V. 30) . . . . . hundreds of the hoofs of the numerous galloping horses which reached [the place] . . . . . .

No. 74 ; PLATE LXII
KAHLA PLATES OF SODHADEVA : (VIKRAMA) YEAR 1135

THESE plates were discovered in 1889 by a cultivator in his filed at Kahal¹ (long. 83⁰ 23' E. lat. 26⁰ 23' N.), a village in the tappa Athaisi of the pargaṇā Dhuriāpār of the Gorakhpur District in Uttar Pradesh. They are now deposited in the Provincial Museum, Lucknow. The inscription on them has been edited before, without any translation or lithograph, by Dr. Kielhorn in the Epigraphia Indica, Vol. VII, pp. 85 ff. It is edited here from excellent ink impressions kindly furnished by Rai Bahadur Prayag Dayal, Curator of the Museum.

They are two copper-plates² inscribed on the inner side only, each measuring about I' 5¼” broad and I' I” high. Their ends are raised into a low rim for the protec-
_____________________

1Kahla lies on the Gorakhpur-Azamgarh metalled road, about 28 m. from Gorakhpur.
2 Kielhorn has stated that it is a single copper-plate inscribed on both sides, but this was evidently due to wrong information supplied to him.

 

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