The Indian Analyst
 

South Indian Inscriptions

 

 

Contents

Introduction

Preface

Contents

List of Plates

Abbreviations

Corrigenda

Images

Introduction

The Discovery of the Vakatakas

Vakataka Chronology

The Home of The Vakatakas

Early Rulers

The Main Branch

The Vatsagulma Branch

Administration

Religion

Society

Literature

Architecture, Sculpture and Painting

Texts And Translations  

Inscriptions of The Main Branch

Inscriptions of The Feudatories of The Main Branch

Inscriptions of The Vatsagulma Branch

Inscriptions of The Ministers And Feudatories of The Vatsagulma Branch

Index

Other South-Indian Inscriptions 

Volume 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Vol. 4 - 8

Volume 9

Volume 10

Volume 11

Volume 12

Volume 13

Volume 14

Volume 15

Volume 16

Volume 17

Volume 18

Volume 19

Volume 20

Volume 22
Part 1

Volume 22
Part 2

Volume 23

Volume 24

Volume 26

Volume 27

Tiruvarur

Darasuram

Konerirajapuram

Tanjavur

Annual Reports 1935-1944

Annual Reports 1945- 1947

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 2, Part 2

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 7, Part 3

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 1

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 2

Epigraphica Indica

Epigraphia Indica Volume 3

Epigraphia
Indica Volume 4

Epigraphia Indica Volume 6

Epigraphia Indica Volume 7

Epigraphia Indica Volume 8

Epigraphia Indica Volume 27

Epigraphia Indica Volume 29

Epigraphia Indica Volume 30

Epigraphia Indica Volume 31

Epigraphia Indica Volume 32

Paramaras Volume 7, Part 2

Śilāhāras Volume 6, Part 2

Vākāṭakas Volume 5

Early Gupta Inscriptions

Archaeological Links

Archaeological-Survey of India

Pudukkottai

INSCRIPTIONS OF THE FEUDATORIES OF THE MAIN BRANCH

 

No. 22 : PLATE XXII
GANJ STONE INSCRIPTION OF VYĀGHRADĒVA

... THIS inscription was discovered by Mr. R.D. Banerji in 1919. It was edited for the first time with a facsimile and a translation by Dr. V.S. Sukthankar in the Epigraphia Indica, Vol. XVII, pp. 12 ff. It is edited here from the same facsimile.

...The inscription is engraved on a detached slab of stone which Mr. Banerji found lying at the bottom of a ḍoṅgā, adjoining a hill called Maluhā-ṭongi near Ganj in the former Ajayagaḍh state, now included in Madhya Pradēsh. Close by is a ruined stone structure, probably a dam to hold the waters of the stream passing along the ḍoṅgā. The findspot of the present inscription it not far removed from the ruined city of Kuṭhārā where the Nachnē-kī-talāi inscriptions were discovered1.

...The present inscription is much better preserved than the preceding two records of the same king. The writing covers a space 2’ 1” by 1’. As in the Nachnē-kī-talāi inscriptions, there is in the centre of the first line the figure of a wheel. The characters are of the box−headed variety of the southern alphabets, resembling closely those of the preceding two records. As observed by Sukthankar, they are unequal in size and uncouth in appearance. The language is Sanskrit and the whole record is in prose. The orthography shows the same peculiarities as in the two preceding inscriptions.

The inscription is of Vyāghradēva, who mediated on the feet of the Vākāṭaka Mahārāja Pṛithivīshēṇa. He was evidently a feudatory of the latter. The object of the inscription is to record that Vyāghradēva did something, perhaps a dam to stem the waters of a stream, for the religious merit of his parents. As shown before, this Vyāghra was probably identical with the homonymous prince of the Uchchakalpa dynasty who flourished in circa 470-90 A.C.2 His suzerain was therefore probably the Vākāṭaka king Pṛithivīshēṇa II.

images/95

TRANSLATION8

...Vyāghradēva, who meditates on the feet of the illustrious Pṛithivīshēṇa (II), the Mahārāja of the Vākāṭakas, has made (this) for the religious merit of (his) mother and father.
______________________

1 Ep. Ind., Vol. XVII, p. 12.
2 Sukthankar referred the record to the seventh century A.C.
3 From the facsimile facing page 12 in Ep. Ind., Vol. XVII.
4 The superscript i is not clear.
5 Readकृतवानिति

<< - 14 Page