The Indian Analyst
 

South Indian Inscriptions

 

 

Contents

Introduction

Preface

Contents

List of Plates

Abbreviations

Corrigenda

Images

Introduction

The Discovery of the Vakatakas

Vakataka Chronology

The Home of The Vakatakas

Early Rulers

The Main Branch

The Vatsagulma Branch

Administration

Religion

Society

Literature

Architecture, Sculpture and Painting

Texts And Translations  

Inscriptions of The Main Branch

Inscriptions of The Feudatories of The Main Branch

Inscriptions of The Vatsagulma Branch

Inscriptions of The Ministers And Feudatories of The Vatsagulma Branch

Index

Other South-Indian Inscriptions 

Volume 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Vol. 4 - 8

Volume 9

Volume 10

Volume 11

Volume 12

Volume 13

Volume 14

Volume 15

Volume 16

Volume 17

Volume 18

Volume 19

Volume 20

Volume 22
Part 1

Volume 22
Part 2

Volume 23

Volume 24

Volume 26

Volume 27

Tiruvarur

Darasuram

Konerirajapuram

Tanjavur

Annual Reports 1935-1944

Annual Reports 1945- 1947

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 2, Part 2

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 7, Part 3

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 1

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 2

Epigraphica Indica

Epigraphia Indica Volume 3

Epigraphia
Indica Volume 4

Epigraphia Indica Volume 6

Epigraphia Indica Volume 7

Epigraphia Indica Volume 8

Epigraphia Indica Volume 27

Epigraphia Indica Volume 29

Epigraphia Indica Volume 30

Epigraphia Indica Volume 31

Epigraphia Indica Volume 32

Paramaras Volume 7, Part 2

Śilāhāras Volume 6, Part 2

Vākāṭakas Volume 5

Early Gupta Inscriptions

Archaeological Links

Archaeological-Survey of India

Pudukkottai

VAKATAKA CHRONOLOGY

 

APPENDIX
A NOTE ON DR. R.C. MAJUMDAR’S GENEALOGY AND CHRONOLOGY OF THE VĀKĀṬAKAS

...Dr. R.C. Majumdar has discussed the question of the genealogy and chronology of the Vākāṭakas in the Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal, Vol. XII, pp. 1.f. He gives the following genealogy with the duration of each reign :-

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This chronology is based on the following evidence :-

(i) The Ṛiddhapur plates dated in the 19th regnal year of Pravarasēna II describe the dowager queen Prābhavatīguptā as sāgra-varsha-śata-diva-putra-pautrā. This passage means that Prabhavatīguptā lived for more than a hundred years and had sons and grand- sons. She appears to have survived here brother Kumāragupta whose reign came to an end in 455 A.C. She was probably born about 365 A.C. She became a widow about 420 A.C. when she had three minor sons Divākarasēna, Dāmodarasēna and Pravarasēna. She acted as regent for Divākarasēna for thirteen years. As the 100th year of Prabhāvatīguptā fell before the 19th regnal year of Pravarasēna II, working backwards we get the following approximate years of the accession of her three sons-Divākarasēna 420 A.C., Dāmodarasēna 435 A.C. and Pravarasēna 450 A.C.

(ii) Narēndrasēna of the Main Branch and Harishēṇa of the Bāsim Branch were contemporaries, being sixth in descent from their common ancestor Pravarasēna I, Narēndrasēna’s son Pṛithivīshēṇā II was therefore junior to Harishēṇa. From the list of conquests attributed to Harishēṇa it seems that he overran the territory of the main Vākāṭaka branch. Pṛithivīshēṇa II, who is said to have rescued the fortunes of the family, possibly defeated Harishēṇa or his successor. He was the suzerain of Vyāghradēva who ruled in the Nachnā-Ganj territory.

I now proceed to examine this chronological scheme.

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