The Indian Analyst
 

North Indian Inscriptions

 

 

Contents

Introduction

Contents

List of Plates

Addenda Et Corrigenda

Images

EDITION AND TEXTS

Inscriptions of the Paramaras of Malwa

Inscriptions of the paramaras of chandravati

Inscriptions of the paramaras of Vagada

Inscriptions of the Paramaras of Bhinmal

An Inscription of the Paramaras of Jalor

Other South-Indian Inscriptions 

Volume 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Vol. 4 - 8

Volume 9

Volume 10

Volume 11

Volume 12

Volume 13

Volume 14

Volume 15

Volume 16

Volume 17

Volume 18

Volume 19

Volume 20

Volume 22
Part 1

Volume 22
Part 2

Volume 23

Volume 24

Volume 26

Volume 27

Tiruvarur

Darasuram

Konerirajapuram

Tanjavur

Annual Reports 1935-1944

Annual Reports 1945- 1947

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 2, Part 2

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 7, Part 3

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 1

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 2

Epigraphica Indica

Epigraphia Indica Volume 3

Epigraphia
Indica Volume 4

Epigraphia Indica Volume 6

Epigraphia Indica Volume 7

Epigraphia Indica Volume 8

Epigraphia Indica Volume 27

Epigraphia Indica Volume 29

Epigraphia Indica Volume 30

Epigraphia Indica Volume 31

Epigraphia Indica Volume 32

Paramaras Volume 7, Part 2

Śilāhāras Volume 6, Part 2

Vākāṭakas Volume 5

Early Gupta Inscriptions

Archaeological Links

Archaeological-Survey of India

Pudukkottai

INSCRIPTIONS OF THE PARAMARAS OF MALWA

JHĀLRĀPĀṬAN STONE INSCRIPTION OF THE TIME OF UDAYĀDITYA

TEXT[1]

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No. 22 ; PLATE XXIII
JHĀLRĀPĀṬAN STONE INSCRIPTION OF THE TIME OF UDAYĀDITYA
[Vikrama ] Year 1143

THIS inscription is engraved on a slab of stone which was found lying, some time in the opening years of the present century, by the late Pandit Gaurishankar Ojha, then Curator of the Rājputānā Museum, Ajmer, in a palace locally known as Sarvasukhiyā kōṭhī, at the town of Jhālrāpaṭān, the capital of the former State of that name and now the chief town of a District in Rājasthān. The record was first brought to notice by D. R. Bhandarkar in the Progress Report of the Archaeological Survey of India, Western Circle, for 1905-06, p. 56 (No. 2094) ; and, form an impression prepared and supplied by Ojha, it was edited by Bishweshwar Nath Shastri, giving his transcript thereof, both in Nāgarī and Roman characters, with a translation and facsimile (Pl. XXII), in the Journal of the Asistic Society of Bengal (N.S.), Volume X (1914), pp. 241 ff. The inscription was again noticed in the Annual Report of Indian Epigraphy for 1953-53, No. 419, and the stone bearing it is now exhibited in the Museum at Jhālāwāḍ near Jhālrāpāṭan. It is edited here from an excellent impression supplied to me by the Chief Epigraphist of the Archaeological Survey of India. Unifortunately, nothing is known about the original find-spot of this stone or about the circumstances in which it was found.

...The inscribed portion covers a space measuring about 20.5 cms. broad by 15 cms. high, and contains ten lines of writing. It is in an excellent state of preservation, with the exception of one letter each at the end of lines 3, 4 and 9, where portions of the stone have slightly peeled off. –The size of the letters in the first seven lines varies from about 1 to 1.5 cms, and in the rest of the lines it is about half of it, so that whereas each of the first seven lines contains about twenty aksharas, their number in lines 8 and 9 is about 30 in each. The last line, which too contains letters of equally small size, is engraved in the middle of the surface and measures 14 cms. in breadth.

...The characters are the normal Nāgarī of the eleventh century to which the record belongs, sharing the general peculiarity that the verticals of letters and the pṛishṭha-mātrās show a sudden bend to the right at their lowest extremity. The initial i is formed of two circles placed side by
_________________

[1] From an impression.
[2] Some symbol may have been engraved before this word as shown by a vacant space with some faint traces.
[3] Here are two indistinct letters, as also at the commencement of the next line. From the traces left the reading may conjecturally be restored as ––समीपस्थ––. In the impression which was later on provided by the Chief Epigraphist, I find traces of सम (स्त)राजावलीमालाल(लं)कृतपरम–––.
[4] sandhi is not performed here.
[5] The reading of the bracketed aksharas is conjectural.
[6] The reading is conjectural as required by the sense.
[7] As above, Conjecturally, the three aksharas may be restored as पुत्रेण.
[8] The decimal figure is somewhat indistinct due to over-writing, but the reading is certain. s