The Indian Analyst
 

North Indian Inscriptions

 

 

Contents

Introduction

Preface

Contents

List of Maps and Plates

Abbreviations

Additions and Corrections

Images

Introduction

Political History

The Early Silaharas

The Silaharas of North Konkan

The Silaharas of South Konkan

The Silaharas of Kolhapur

Administration

Religious Condition

Social Condition

Economic Condition

Literature

Architecture and Sculpture

Texts And Translations  

Inscriptions of the Silaharas of North Konkan

Inscriptions of The Silaharas of South Konkan

Inscriptions of The Silaharas of kolhapur

APPENDIX I  

Additional Inscriptions of the Silaharas

APPENDIX II  

A contemporary Yadava Inscription

Index

Other South-Indian Inscriptions 

Volume 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Vol. 4 - 8

Volume 9

Volume 10

Volume 11

Volume 12

Volume 13

Volume 14

Volume 15

Volume 16

Volume 17

Volume 18

Volume 19

Volume 20

Volume 22
Part 1

Volume 22
Part 2

Volume 23

Volume 24

Volume 26

Volume 27

Tiruvarur

Darasuram

Konerirajapuram

Tanjavur

Annual Reports 1935-1944

Annual Reports 1945- 1947

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 2, Part 2

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 7, Part 3

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 1

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 2

Epigraphica Indica

Epigraphia Indica Volume 3

Epigraphia
Indica Volume 4

Epigraphia Indica Volume 6

Epigraphia Indica Volume 7

Epigraphia Indica Volume 8

Epigraphia Indica Volume 27

Epigraphia Indica Volume 29

Epigraphia Indica Volume 30

Epigraphia Indica Volume 31

Epigraphia Indica Volume 32

Paramaras Volume 7, Part 2

Śilāhāras Volume 6, Part 2

Vākāṭakas Volume 5

Early Gupta Inscriptions

Archaeological Links

Archaeological-Survey of India

Pudukkottai

INSCRIPTIONS OF THE SILAHARAS OF NORTH KONKAN

 

..Success ! During the increasingly victorious reign of the illustrious Mahārājādhirāja, Paramēśvara, Pṛīthvīvallabha, the illustrious Mahārāja Amōghavarsha (I), while the great Chief, the illustrious Pullaśakti is governing the whole country of Kōṅkaṇa headed by Purī−(Pullaśakti) who meditates on the feet of the illustrious Kapardin (I) and who has obtained (the titles of ) Mahāsāmanta and Kōṅkaṇavallabha by his (i.e. Amōghavarsha’s) grace− the respectable old Amātya, the illustrious Vishṇugupta, son of the Sarvādhyaksha, the illustrious Pūrṇahari, after having made obeisance to the Holy Community (Saṅgha) a t the famous Kṛishṇagiri, (has donated), out of great kindness, twenty drammas for the worship of the holy (Buddha); three (drammas), for the repairs of what may be damaged or ruined in this very vihāra. For the raiment of the Venerable Community, five drammas shall be expended and for (religious) books, one dramma [1]. As a perpetual endowment [he has deposited] here forty drammas (and) forty, and (also) one hundred and twenty drammas [2] . (The disposition as to the expenditure) of these drammas should be guarded like (one’s ) wife and sons. In the year [765].

No. 2 : PLATES III AND IV
KANHĒRĪ CAVE INSCRIPTION OF KAPARDIN II : ŚAKA YEAR 775

..THIS inscription is engraved on the architrave of the verandah of Cave X, the Darbār or Mahārāja’s Cave at Kānhērī. It was first brought to notice by Dr. E. W. West, who puplished an eye-copy of it in the Journal of the Bombay Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society, Vol VI (1862), pp. 1 f. He numbered this inscription as 15. Thereafter, Pandit Bhagvanlal Indraji published a translation of only its initial portion in the same Journal, Vol. XIII (1879), p. 11, with the following remarks:- “As these (i.e. West’s) facsimiles cannot be read properly, I went myself to the caves on 20th November 1876 to take a correct one; but the inscriptions being at a great height, and having no means to reach them, I could, with difficulty, take a transcript of the name of the king and the date, which are at the beginning of eh inscription.” The translation of this inscription was republished in the Inscriptions from the Cave-Temples ofWestern India (1881), p.61. In 1884, Dr. Kielhorn published a transcript of the text and a translation of it, and discussed its contents in the Indian Antiquary , Vol. XIII, pp. 133 f. His edition was not, however, accompanied by a facsimile of the record. I edit the inscription here from excellent impressions supplied by Mr. M.N. Deshpande of the Archaeological Department. I have consulted Dr. West’s eye-copy and Dr. Kielhorn’s transcript in reading the text of the present inscription.

..‘The inscription consists of six lines. The first three lines are each 11’ 81/2” (356.87 cm) long, the two next each 17’ 8” (538.48 cm ) long and the last is 11’ 81/2” (356.87 cm) long. The letters are about 2” (5.08 cm) high; they are not carved very regularly, but are broader and deeper than in the other inscriptions (Nos. 1 and 3). The inscription is in a fair state of preservation. [3]
________________

[1] The interest on the perpetual endowments was to be spent for the four objects mentioned here. The reading and, therefore, the interpretation of this portion are, however, uncertain. I have followed Kielhorn in regard to them. The deposited amounts (viz. 40, 40 and 120) are separately mentioned, because, as Kielhorn surmised, they were entrusted to different persons or See C.I.I., Vol, pp. 1 f.
[2] Kielhorn read kāṁchana (gold) in place of ekaṁ (one more), and supposed that the 120 drammas were of gold. This is incorrect. The dramma was a silver coin. See Studies in Indology, Vol. IV, pp. 213 f.
[3] Ind. Ant., Vol. XIII, p. 133.

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