The Indian Analyst
 

South Indian Inscriptions

 

 

Contents

Introduction

Preface

Contents

List of Plates

Abbreviations

Corrigenda

Images

Introduction

The Discovery of the Vakatakas

Vakataka Chronology

The Home of The Vakatakas

Early Rulers

The Main Branch

The Vatsagulma Branch

Administration

Religion

Society

Literature

Architecture, Sculpture and Painting

Texts And Translations  

Inscriptions of The Main Branch

Inscriptions of The Feudatories of The Main Branch

Inscriptions of The Vatsagulma Branch

Inscriptions of The Ministers And Feudatories of The Vatsagulma Branch

Index

Other South-Indian Inscriptions 

Volume 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Vol. 4 - 8

Volume 9

Volume 10

Volume 11

Volume 12

Volume 13

Volume 14

Volume 15

Volume 16

Volume 17

Volume 18

Volume 19

Volume 20

Volume 22
Part 1

Volume 22
Part 2

Volume 23

Volume 24

Volume 26

Volume 27

Tiruvarur

Darasuram

Konerirajapuram

Tanjavur

Annual Reports 1935-1944

Annual Reports 1945- 1947

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 2, Part 2

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 7, Part 3

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 1

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 2

Epigraphica Indica

Epigraphia Indica Volume 3

Epigraphia
Indica Volume 4

Epigraphia Indica Volume 6

Epigraphia Indica Volume 7

Epigraphia Indica Volume 8

Epigraphia Indica Volume 27

Epigraphia Indica Volume 29

Epigraphia Indica Volume 30

Epigraphia Indica Volume 31

Epigraphia Indica Volume 32

Paramaras Volume 7, Part 2

Śilāhāras Volume 6, Part 2

Vākāṭakas Volume 5

Early Gupta Inscriptions

Archaeological Links

Archaeological-Survey of India

Pudukkottai

THE HOME OF THE VAKATAKAS

CHAPTER III
THE HOME OF THE VĀKĀṬAKAS

 

...THE Vākāṭakas are generally believed to be of northern origin. Thus, Vincent Smith, in his article on the Vākāṭakas, says, ‘If Vindhyaśakti and Pravarasēna are the same persons as Vindhyaśakti and Pravīra of the Purāṇas, the origin of the family must be sought somewhere in the area now known as Central India’. Jayaswal went one step further and derived the dynastic name Vākāṭaka from Vakāṭa or Vākāṭa on the analogy of Traikūṭaka, which is plainly formed from Trikūṭa. He identified this Vākāṭa, the supposed home-land of the Vākāṭakas, with Bāgāṭ, a village in the northernmost part of the former ōrchhā State, six miles east of Chirgaon in the District of Jhānsī. ‘The Brāhmaṇa’. says Jayaswal, ‘who, according to the Purāṇas, was the first annointed king and the founder of the dynasty and who assumed the appropriate appellation of Vindhyaśakti, adopted the name of his own town as his dynastic title’. The northern origin of the Vākāṭakas has been tacitly admitted by almost all scholars who have written on this subject1. I therefore propose to examine critically the evidence on which it is based.

...(1)The main basis of this theory of the northern origin of the Vākāṭakas is the following passage in the Purāṇas2 :–

images/xl

...This passage is introduced with the words, ‘Hear also the future rulers of Vidiśā’, and mentions towards the close the names of Vindhyaśakti and Pravīra, who are undoubtedly kings of the Vākāṭaka dynasty. It has, therefore, been supposed that Vindhyaśakti and Pravīra ruled somewhere in Central India, not far from Vidiśā, modern Bēsnagar near Bhilsā. This passage mentions several kings; but none of them, with the exception of the two mentioned above, are known from any other source. Besides, it is not clear how far the scope of the introductory statement images/xl1 extends. That all the kings mentioned in this passage were not of Vidiśā was realised by Pargiter also, who gave the heading ‘Dynasties of Vidiśā, etc.’ to it. It is noteworthy that the passage introduces Śiśuka, the ruler of Purikā, in verse 5. Purikā, we know from the
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1 See e.g. N.H.I.P., Vol. VI, p.96. The southern origin of the Vākāṭakas was first out by me in N.U.J., No. 3, pp. 22 f.
2 D.K.A., pp. 49-50.