The Indian Analyst
 

North Indian Inscriptions

 

 

Contents

Introduction

Preface

Contents

List of Maps and Plates

Abbreviations

Additions and Corrections

Images

Introduction

Political History

The Early Silaharas

The Silaharas of North Konkan

The Silaharas of South Konkan

The Silaharas of Kolhapur

Administration

Religious Condition

Social Condition

Economic Condition

Literature

Architecture and Sculpture

Texts And Translations  

Inscriptions of the Silaharas of North Konkan

Inscriptions of The Silaharas of South Konkan

Inscriptions of The Silaharas of kolhapur

APPENDIX I  

Additional Inscriptions of the Silaharas

APPENDIX II  

A contemporary Yadava Inscription

Index

Other South-Indian Inscriptions 

Volume 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Vol. 4 - 8

Volume 9

Volume 10

Volume 11

Volume 12

Volume 13

Volume 14

Volume 15

Volume 16

Volume 17

Volume 18

Volume 19

Volume 20

Volume 22
Part 1

Volume 22
Part 2

Volume 23

Volume 24

Volume 26

Volume 27

Tiruvarur

Darasuram

Konerirajapuram

Tanjavur

Annual Reports 1935-1944

Annual Reports 1945- 1947

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 2, Part 2

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Volume 7, Part 3

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 1

Kalachuri-Chedi Era Part 2

Epigraphica Indica

Epigraphia Indica Volume 3

Epigraphia
Indica Volume 4

Epigraphia Indica Volume 6

Epigraphia Indica Volume 7

Epigraphia Indica Volume 8

Epigraphia Indica Volume 27

Epigraphia Indica Volume 29

Epigraphia Indica Volume 30

Epigraphia Indica Volume 31

Epigraphia Indica Volume 32

Paramaras Volume 7, Part 2

Śilāhāras Volume 6, Part 2

Vākāṭakas Volume 5

Early Gupta Inscriptions

Archaeological Links

Archaeological-Survey of India

Pudukkottai

INSCRIPTIONS OF THE SILAHARAS OF NORTH KONKAN

 

..figures too, 755 years−of the era of the Śaka King had passed, on the aforesaid (lunar) day of the said fortnight of the said month and year, during the increasingly victorious reign of the Paramabhaṭṭāraka, Mahārājādhirāja and Paramēśvara, the illustrious Amōghavarsha (I), who medidates on the feet of the Paramabhaṭṭāraka, Mahārājādhirāja and Parmēśvara, the illustrious Jagattuṅgadēva (i.e. Gōvinda III), during the increasingly victorious reign of the illustrious king Kapardin (II), the chief among the Mahāsāmantas, who has obtained the five mahāśabdas, and who meditates on the feet of the illustrious Pullaśakti, who was the lord of the entire Kōṅkaṇa, which he had obtained though his (i.e. Amōghavarsha’s) grace, and who was the Chief among the Mahāsāmantas and had obtained the five mahāsabdas-

..(Lines 4-5) − The Gōmin Avighnākara, a devout worshipper of the Sugata (i.e. Buddha), who has come to this very place from the country of Gauḍa, has made a perpetual endowment of one hundred drammas for the rooms for meditation and the clothing (of the monks) at this Mahārāja-Mahāvihāra on the famous Kṛishṇagiri.

..This perpetual endowment will be used by me so long as I live. On my death, competent persons shall fix the interest[1] and shall necessarily donate it (for the above-mentioned purpose), and shall cause no obstruction.

..He who will misappropriate this will be born in the Avīchi, Parītāpa, Kumbhīpāka and other hells, (and) will have for his food cow-flesh vomitted by dogs.

.. This deed has been approved and confirmed in the presence of the Venerable Community and has been caused to be written.

.. The witnesses[2] of this are the Pattiyāṇaka Yōga and the Āchārya of (the village) Chikhyallapallikā. Religious merit will accrue to the adviser and the witnesses.

.. (Line 6)− O heavenly Buddha ! Never will fortune attend him who wrongs living beings. To him who is of good conduct, will I give. He should approach as a worthy recipient. To him shall necessarily be given; for sin is not noticed in him.

.. Herein whatever may be deficient in letters or redundant in letters, all that it authoritative.

NO. 3 : PLATES V AND VI
KĀNHĒRĪ CAVE INSCRIPTION OF KAPARDIN II : ŚAKA YEAR 799

.. THIS inscription is, like No. 1, engraved on the architrave of Cave No. 78, just opposite to the Darbār of Mahārājā’s Cave No. 10 at Kānhērī. It was first brought to notice by Dr. E. W. West, who published an eye-copy of it in the Journal of the Bombay Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society, Vol. VI (1862), pp. 1 f. He combined this inscription with No. 1 above, and numbered them both as No. 43. Thereafter, Pandit Bhagvanlal Indraji published a translation of only its initial portion, containing the name of the king and the date, in the same Journal, Vol. XIII (1878), pp. 11-12. The same translation was included in the Inscriptions from the Cave-Temples of Western India, p. 62. In 1884, Dr. Kielhorn published a transcript of the text and a translation of it and discussed its contents in the Indian Antiquary, Vol. XIII, pp. 133 f. His edition of this record was not, however, accompanied by a facsimile. I edit the inscription here from excellent impressions supplied by Mr. M. N. Deshpande of the Archaeological Department. I have consulted Dr. West’s eye-copy and Dr. Kielhorn’s transcript in reading the text of the present inscription.
__________________________

[1] I take kārī used in the text in the sense of interest, following Kielhorn, though no lexicon gives that sense.
[2] For these witnesses, see above, p. 4, n. 3.

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